Taking the ‘careering’ out of your career
"As redundancy looms large on the horizon for thousands of employees, getting ahead of setbacks like this can help speed up your personal recovery and future proof your career. If you make the time now to the lay the foundations, you will be better able to harness your resilience and continue to move forward with your career plans."

As redundancy looms large on the horizon for thousands of employees, getting ahead of setbacks like this can help speed up your personal recovery and future proof your career. If you make the time now to the lay the foundations, you will be better able to harness your resilience and continue to move forward with your career plans.

Redundancy is a personal journey

If you are the only person made redundant or part of a larger group, the way you react and respond to the situation will be highly personal.  Redundancy is a bit like grief: there are defined stages, however we all spend different amounts of time in each one and we all react differently.  It’s important to focus on yourself instead of comparing with others.

What helps?

Most people feel shock on hearing that they are being made redundant and shock can lead to a variety of different behaviours.  Many people try to keep their ‘head down’ in denial, others hope against hope that it’s all a mistake.  Others immediately spring into action and begin job-hunting and interviewing whilst some people decide that this is the time to make their dreams reality and start a career change.  None of these are wrong but neither are they always productive.  

The 2008 recession marked the beginning of my coaching career, and in the first few years after qualifying, I coached 50+ clients through redundancy. 

Here’s what we know

  1. It’s important to take time to consider your next move – even if you need a job/money etc.  Good decision-making is vital.
  • Evaluating your career to date, your personal qualities and your skills is the best way to establish confidence.
  • If career change is something you are considering, do it thoroughly.  Picturing your future vision is not enough – make sure you consider your available resources and what you may need to succeed.
  • Identify where you have rocked and where you’ve not succeeded.  We develop patterns of behaviour throughout our lives and careers often mirror them.  Knowing what is an enabler or a block will save time and further your chances of success.
  • Identifying your next move, setting objectives to get there and actually committing to doing them is how you will move on positively.

Our new career transformation programme covers all of this.  It’s like having career coaching but you benefit from your fellow group members experiences and observations.  Visit https://birdsoup.co.uk/career-transformation-programme/ to find out more, register interest and sign up.  In only 7 hours of group coaching you will know so much about yourself, your career and life goals as well as have a 6 -12 month plan to move to your next step.  Don’t let stuff happen to you, be prepared and get ahead. ACT NOW!!

Photo by Einar Storsul on Unsplash